Thursday, 6 June 2019

1st time pass

Well done Brooke on passing your Automatic driving test first time with only 8 minor faults in Northampton.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Friday, 25 May 2018

!st Time Automatic Driving Test Pass

Well done Ayla on passing your Automatic driving test 1st time! in Northampton with only 6 minor faults

Wednesday, 11 April 2018

New app for your phone "testi" for finding short notice driving tests. I am getting good reports.

Wednesday, 8 November 2017

Driving test link

http://www.gov.uk/book-practical-driving-test This is the correct address to book your UK driving test. Use the link below to book your early practical driving test and get a discount. This is the cheapest driving test finder i have found. https://www.drivingtestgenie.co.uk/signup?voucher=MRM13711

Monday, 9 October 2017

Constanta passes her Automatic driving test in Northampton second time with only two minors! Well done Constanta! we moved her driving test forward and Constanta took her second driving test within four weeks of failing her first test.
Well done Slavyan on passing first time with only five minors in Northampton!.Slavyan moved his Automatic driving test from Luton to Northampton and moved it forward by using my short notice Automatic driving test service.
Well done Liam on passing your Automatic driving test in Northampton on your second attempt with only two minors!.Liam failed his first test just three weeks before with just two minors and one serious fault and used my short notice test service to move he next test from December.

Sunday, 1 October 2017

Well done Adrian on passing your Automatic driving test in Northampton UK with only one minor fault after using my short notice driving test finder service.
Well done Hayley on passing your Automatic driving test first time in Northampton UK after using my short notice driving test finder service.

Wednesday, 5 October 2016

Well done Clare on passing the Automatic driving test first time in Northampton with only 8 minors.

Thursday, 5 February 2015

First time driving test pass in Northampton uk with zero faults!



Well done to Hollie on passing her driving test first time on the manual car in Northampton UK with 0 faults!

Make a New year resolution to improve your driving.

New post on The Safe Driver

Is it time to make a fresh start with your driving?

by safedriver
mudAs written for The Insurance Hunters. Please visit their blog.
Mmm, fresh! I love the smell of fresh baked foods, fresh air and freshly cut grass. There’s something to be said about starting new. Many people make New Year resolutions at the beginning of the calendar year with the hope of making changes that will be positive in their life. With that being said, I’d thought I would offer some suggestions for drivers who would like to start new skills during this calendar year.
The first suggestion I would like to offer is driving attitude. Many drivers are less patient than they could be while driving. Instead of getting annoyed with other road users, take a deep breath and ask yourself what is it about their actions that goes against what you’re doing. Does it really affect you as much as you think it does? After having this change of attitude over a month or so, you’ll be a much calmer driver, making better driving decisions because you’ll be thinking clearer.
Another new tip to offer is to become more of a proactive driver. Some people are chronic late comers. They leave things to the last moment. If this sounds like you, try these tips. Once you know how long your commute will be, leave early enough to give yourself an extra 10 or 15 minutes for travel. If you get to work 10 or 15 minutes early, you’ll have time to grab a coffee and relax before starting your work day. If you need that extra 10 or 15 minutes during your commute, you won’t be tempted to rush and make poor driving choices because you’ll be late.
Something that many drivers could benefit from making a new start is cleanliness. I’m not talking personal hygiene, I’m talking the vehicle. Securing loose items from inside the vehicle means less distractions. Items stuffed under the driver’s seat can become dislodged and can roll under the brake pedal. That may prohibit the driver from braking firmly in an emergency. Loose items such as wrappers and paper can blow around on a windy day in the spring and summer with the windows down, so put those away before driving so they don’t take your attention away from the driving task.
The last suggestion for a fresh start this year I would have to say should be slowing down sooner when approaching red lights or stopped traffic. Early slowing has many benefits for drivers. It saves fuels, saves brake wear and gives you the feeling that you’re going someplace. That feeling will often help you feeling positive as a driver and become less stressed on your daily commute.
These are just a few suggestions to get you started off in the New Year. Will you use them? Will you keep them longer than a week? I hope so, but don’t limit your fresh start to just these few. Make the entire year your year of safe driving.

Comment   See all comments   Like

Tuesday, 20 January 2015

First time driving test pass in Northampton UK.

Well Done! Linda.
A first time pass is not an easy task!


Thank you for the card.
You are most welcome.

Wednesday, 14 January 2015

Great advice from the Safe Driver. Driving comes first.

New post on The Safe Driver

Is using a cell phone while driving an addiction?

by safedriver
close upIt’s been a few years since our governments have made using a cell phone without a hands-free device illegal while driving. Sitting at a red light in traffic and using your phone is also illegal. Even though it’s been illegal for some time and widely publicized, it still happens every day. The numbers of tickets given out to drivers from police have risen each year even though public awareness of the risks associated to cell phone use while driving is huge. However, I think I have an explanation for this.
Our society has gotten so busy over the past few decades that we want things done immediately. Think about it. Drive-thru’s are available not just at fast food restaurants, but at the bank, some beer stores and I’ve even seen them at a store if you want to buy cigarettes. Let’s face it, we’re in a hurry and we have a problem. We’re far more impatient than we used to be. Having a cell phone means we can immediately act upon our thoughts. The key word here is immediately. When it comes to our cell phones, we can’t seem to control the urge to touch it, look at it or play with it.
For many people, our lives greatly depend upon the social networks. It seems like we can’t go a minute without checking messages, tweeting or checking someone’s status. After all, how can we expect to go on with our day without knowing what are friends are doing at that exact moment? It almost seems like an addiction doesn’t it? I know that sounds harsh, but a standard dictionary definition of addiction is “The fact or condition of being addicted to or having constant need to a particular substance, thing, or activity.” Doesn’t that sound familiar? Isn’t that what millions of people have when it comes to their cell phones – an addiction? Some may call it a habit, but whether you call it an addiction or a habit, you need to have control over it.
This addiction to the cell phone, like any other addiction, controls your brain. Our brains have a sense of reward when we accomplish something. It’s a matter of prioritising the reward though. Is there more mental satisfaction to complete a text message conversation or is there more mental satisfaction to drive the vehicle safely? To many people, driving takes a “backseat”, so to speak, to finding out what’s happening in cyber land.
Like any other addiction, you need to admit you have a problem. Acknowledging that you have a problem is the first step to controlling it. Once you do acknowledge there is a problem, you can begin the healing process of finding a solution to this problem. You’ll more likely listen to your friends and family once you’ve made this realization. Since I consider myself a friend of yours, I’d like to offer a few suggestions.
Before you get to your vehicle turn your phone off. If you don’t hear it, you may not be tempted to use it. Put your phone out of your reach. I mean really out of your reach. If you put the phone in your coat pocket and place your coat just behind your seat, you may be tempted to reach for it while driving. Secure the phone in a backpack, briefcase or other location that would make it relatively impossible to get to it while driving. Give it to a passenger to use while you’re driving. Let them text, tweet or post messages for you.
Addressing the addiction or habit will take time, a commitment from you and support from family and friends. Trust me, it will be worth it. Take it from a friend.
Another related post is HERE

Thursday, 4 December 2014

Take a break to stay awake.


Take a break – stay awake

by safedriver
one way at nightAs written for The Insurance Hunters. Please visit their blog.
I sometimes wonder what life would be like if we weren’t so busy. Would we be bored or would we learn to become more relaxed? Whether you’re busy with your job, your family or your pastimes, it can take quite a toll on us and cause fatigue. If these activities also cause you to drive, what can you do to combat fatigued driving?
What does fatigued driving or drowsy driving do to us? When our brain is tired it stops us from making proper decisions. It’s late getting messages to our eyes, hands and feet. Think of how you act at home when you’re tired. You may not be thinking clearly and may forget to do things. Now imagine that in the vehicle. Too dangerous to even consider, yet many people ignore the symptoms.
We need to recognize the early signs of fatigue. If you’re having a difficult time keeping your eyes open, extremely low energy, yawning a lot, drifting in your lane or have very little focus it’s time to do something different. Recognizing many of these signs beforegetting into your vehicle is best, but during some longer drives these symptoms begin to appear while you’re already in motion. So what are the common things drivers do to help stay alert while driving?
Many drivers will drink strong coffee, blow cold air on their face, play loud music and try to have a diverse conversation to help keep them alert. It may work, but only for a very short period of time. The best solution is sleep.  Find a safe place to pull over and rest. Find a parking lot, lock your doors and have that 15 to 20 minute nap. For many people, this little snooze refreshes them enough to become alert once again and become safe to drive. If you need more time than that, take it.
Now that’s all fine and dandy as a reactive solution, but let’s look at a proactive way to avoid fatigued driving altogether. Get plenty of rest before starting that long drive. Schedule breaks every couple of hours to allow you time to get out, stretch and perhaps take a washroom break. The best proactive solution is to share the driving with passengers, but do that before you get too tired. Avoid heavy meals before driving. Light snacks are better than a big meal. Apples are great to keep you alert and awake. And the last tip is to keep the temperature cool inside the vehicle. A very warm interior causes drowsiness.
I’m sure we all know stubborn drivers. They say they can handle while fatigued. Good drivers realize they can’t handle it. Having your eyes closed for just three seconds at 50 km/h (30 mph) means your vehicle travels roughly 40 metres. You’ll most likely pass through an intersection too and perhaps a stop sign or red light. I’m pretty certain you and your passengers deserve better. Take a break – stay awake.

driving in fog

Driving in fog

The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales and is essential reading for everyone.
Rule 236
You MUST NOT use front or rear fog lights unless visibility is seriously reduced (see Rule 226) as they dazzle other road users and can obscure your brake lights. You MUST switch them off when visibility improves.Law RVLR regs 25 & 27

Wednesday, 26 November 2014

New post on The Safe Driver

Win the parking lot battle

by safedriver
tire change 004There’s something we all do as drivers that many seem to overlook as being risky – driving through the dreaded parking lot during the holiday season. For many drivers during this time of year it becomes an all-out combat zone to find that one remaining vacant parking space. Driving manners seem to be thrown out the window, but there are things you can do to win the battle.
Driving up and down the aisles during this busy time of year means you’ll find pedestrians walking between vehicles to get to and from the stores and their vehicle. Larger vehicles such as vans and SUVs can hide the pedestrians from you and you from them. To help keep everyone safe, reduce your speed and drive toward the centre of the aisle. By driving away from the parked vehicles, you’re improving the angle you and the pedestrians have of each other. It allows each of you to see each other sooner and will also give more response time for both of you in case either of you have to stop. Ensure you drift back toward the right side of your aisle when oncoming vehicle approach and as you approach any intersecting aisle. This will protects you from vehicles turning sharply into your aisle as it will give them more space to enter.
Treat the aisle you’re driving in as you would a roadway. Yield to pedestrians and cross traffic, signal your intentions so everyone else knows which way you’re planning to go, including your parking space once you find one. To find that parking space, it’s best to start at one end of the parking lot and work your way to the other side. Be prepared to park further away than you may like during peak times, so ensure you’re wearing good walking shoes.
bad parkingPerhaps the best tip to find that elusive parking space is to decide when the best time to get to the mall would be. If you can go there when the stores first open while many others are either at work or in school, you’ll find plenty of parking spots. Not only will the parking be plentiful, but the stores won’t be as busy, therefore your shopping trip will take less time. If you can do that it will seem to be a win-win for you. Not all of us can do that, so that may not work for some.
One final tip to finding an empty parking space in a busy parking lot is to head directly to a set of doors to find people leaving the mall. Let them begin walking toward their vehicle and you then follow them, staying well back. Once you find which vehicle they’re getting into, put on your turn signal and position your vehicle ready to park. That should help you find that last space.
Whichever tip you use, do it safely and be patient. An empty space will arrive soon enough. And when it does, you’ve won the battle.

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

First time driving test pass in Northampton with the Automatic car. Well done Ian Harvey for passing with only 3 minor marks!

Wednesday, 29 October 2014

r
Recent driving test passes in Northampton in the Automatic car.
To read my latest reviews click here.

Wednesday, 24 September 2014

Well done to  Sarah on passing first time in Northampton with only 4 minors in the Automatic car with Mr Melvin Meakins ADI.

Friday, 14 February 2014

First time Automatic driving test pass in Northampton.

Well done Caz Izzard on passing the Automatic driving test first time in Northampton with only four minor faults!.

My review site.


Friday, 24 January 2014

Another Automatic Driving Test pass in Northampton UK.

Miss Adedamola Oluokun passes her driving test in Northampton UK with only six minor faults.
https://plus.google.com/116899543186041544383/posts/BBTy4grNyGC
Automatic driving test pass in Northampton UK

Read Adedam's review here.
My review's

To pass your driving test in Northampton UK. Do the opposit of this

How to fail your road test

by safedriver
mannersAs most people I come to meet through Young Drivers of Canada they want to pass their road test and get their driver’s licence as soon as possible. Some of the students I’ve taught over the years actually want to drive safely. Passing the road test is just a step for them. Good thinking in my books.
Now, in most cases you can fail the road test by any violation of the law, a dangerous action and of course, a collision. Other factors would include poor observation on a regular basis and consistent errors of the same nature. These factors for failing are fairly consistent within most jurisdictions, but with this list, I’m trying to think outside the box.
Regardless of the goals you may set for yourself, I thought it may be a good idea to come up with a top 10 list to help people with their road test. Some top 10 lists have been done over and over again, so I had to be a little creative. After a long 15 seconds of thought, I decided what my top 10 list would contain. The following is the top 10 ways to fail your road test. *Not to be tried on an actual road test. See how many of these you may be tempted to do.

10. Lay on the horn and chase pedestrians out of the crosswalk.
9. Constantly ask the examiner out on a date.
8. Answer “Okay baby” after each instruction the examiner gives you.
7. Play the Fast and the Furious theme song while driving your road test.
6. Get dressed up for the test by wearing your birthday suit.
5. Use the parking brake to slide your vehicle sideways into your parallel park position.
4. Shift to neutral and rev the engine while looking at the driver next to you at a red light.
3. Curse aloud at the driver who just cut you off during their lane change.
2. Suddenly look over your shoulder out the rear window and yell “Crap! It’s the cops!”
1. Say to the examiner “Whatever you do, don’t open the glove box”.
This was certainly a fun tongue-in-cheek article to write and I hope you never end up doing any of these crazy things during a road test. I’m certain you won’t know anyone who has tried these things during their road test. Or have you? For anyone who has tried any of these things, you’ve created a lot of talk around the office water cooler…to say the least.

Thursday, 23 January 2014

Automatic Driving Test Pass in Northampton UK

 Mr Edgars Podnieks pass his Automatic driving test in Kettering with only six minor faults.

Edgars has been learning on and off for ten years!

With the help of the short notice test plan he finally could fit his driving test into his busy life!.

Well done Edgars

Check my reviews here!

My review page.

Tuesday, 3 December 2013

Why you need Driving Lessons in the UK to pass a driving test.

As an American who recently passed the UK driving theory and practical tests, I have a new found respect for all the motorists I encounter on British roads.
To get my American license when I was 16 years old, I had to take a very short multiple choice theory test. Having not studied and never driven, I passed easily. Then I took a practical test that consisted of a 15-minute amble through a flat rural area. I performed poorly, and at the end of my test the examiner turned to me and said, "You really don't know what you're doin', do ya?" And he passed me.
I initially assumed the UK test was comparable to the one across the pond. But then I read that the large majority of UK motorists fail their first driving exam. And I heard horror stories of Americans and other foreigners failing multiple times. I began to study (or "revise" as you Brits say) in earnest.
I'm a doctoral student at Cambridge, and I'm quite sure I prepared much more for my driving tests than I will for my PhD viva next year.
A UK license is basically a PhD in driving.
I read the Highway Code. I read the entire 528-page AA Complete Test book, reviewing all of its 948 multiple-choice questions. I bought the Driving Test Success DVD, watching hours of slightly awkward inside-the-car footage of UK driving lessons. I watched countless "hazard perception" videos on YouTube.
The night before my practical test I fell asleep around 2am on my sofa with my laptop on my stomach as I watched "show me, tell me" vehicle safety tutorials. Had I not watched those videos, my answer to every vehicle safety question during the real test would have been "I would call my dad and then call AA."
(Note to American readers: AA is the British equivalent of AAA, but for some reason they don't call it the "American Automobile Association" in the UK.)
In the course of my studies I had to learn all those charming British motoring terms. To me, many of the terms sounded more like names for rock and folk bands. You know, when I was a teenager I loved heavy metal bands like Kerb, Slip Road, and MOT, and punk bands like The Rising Bollards. Now that I'm older, I prefer the gentler acoustic sound of bands like Soft Verge, Central Reservation, Pelican Crossing, Gantry Sign, and Urban Clearway, though I can still dig the pop-punk energy of Double Mini Roundabout.
I also had to create mnemonic devices to remember the differences between Britain's bird-name road crossings. A toucan crossing is where "two can" cross – both pedestrians and cyclists. At a puffin crossing, a pedestrian may be "huffin' and puffin' to get across" because there is no flashing amber light. Oh, apparently "amber" means "yellow" in English English. I've taken to calling Britain's other traffic lights ruby and emerald.
Thanks to my preparation, I passed the theory test, though my hazard perception score was hazardously low.
When the moment of my practical test arrived, I was a nervous wreck – though thankfully not a literal wreck. I tried to endear myself to my stiff-upper-lipped examiner by noting that the driving tests in America are "a bit different". He chuckled and said, "they're a joke".
To be fair to Americans, we drive big automatic cars on wide, open, straight roads, and most of our country is farmland and wilderness. Most of our towns and cities were laid out after the invention of the automobile. America is a car-based civilization. A Declaration of Independence from public transportation is part of our national psyche. A burdensome license test would be seen as an infringement on our fundamental human right to drive.
Things are "a bit different" in Britain. You have eight times the population density of the United States and many of your narrow, windy roads were developed before the invention of even the horse-drawn coach.
My American compatriots are shocked when I tell them that to earn a UK license I had to take a lengthy theory test, computerized hazard perception test, eye sight test, vehicle safety test, and a 40-minute driving test with a meticulous examiner jotting down each of my "faults" in real time.
As my faults mounted during the test, I prayed that we would turn back toward the test centre before I surpassed the maximum level of acceptable faultiness. I'm a married homeowner who drives an MPV with two toddlers in car seats; I'm hardly a risk-taker on the road. But I am an American. The examiner perceived my hazardousness and marked me down for not looking in my mirrors before I signalled – seven times.
Now I'm always conscious of looking in the mirrors before I signal and manoeuvre. Thanks to the rigors of the UK driving test, I'm a much safer driver, and I'm glad that I share the road with a nation of drivers who had to pass the same demanding test.
The people of Great Britain can be rightfully proud of their great driving skills. Whereas the easy US tests make me wary of American drivers, here in the UK, I've embraced the mantra Keep Calm and Drive On.
• This article was amended on 2 December 2013 to correct a reference to mnemonic devices, from pneumonic devices.

Monday, 25 November 2013

Automatic Driving School driving test pass.

Well done Paul on passing your driving test first time with only one minor fault.!
Mr Paul Hillyer only had sixteen driving lessons in the Automatic car in Northampton.

Sunday, 13 October 2013

Stev passes his driving test first time on the Automatic car in Northampton.

Well done Stev on your first time pass in Northampton in the Automatic car.

Samira passes her driving test only two weeks from her last driving test.

Well done Samira on passing your driving test in the Automatic car in Northampton. After nearly passing her driving test Samira did not want to wait 8 weeks for her next so made use of the short notice test system and took her next driving test two weeks later.

Andrew passes his driving test first time in Northampton.

Andrew passes his driving test first time!. In the Automatic car in Northampton.



If you would like to leave a review please click the link above.

Friday, 30 August 2013

Have you the right attitude?


Posted by: safedriver | August 29, 2013

Define “professional driver”

IMG-20130821-00546I think we’ve all done things that were a little risky throughout our lives. Sometimes we do them without much thought. Hindsight is great though because after doing what was essentially wrong and/or dangerous, we realized it was something we shouldn’t have done to begin with. What would possess us to do things like this, especially while driving? Like the driver of this vehicle who decided to drive along the sidewalk to reach a specific driveway instead of waiting their turn in traffic. Did they have this plan originally when they got into the vehicle or was it something they did at the spur of the moment?
I recently did a live morning show on television when I said that every driver should be a professional driver. This wasn’t asking each person to earn a living while driving, but it was more about acting more professional when behind the wheel. Essentially this meant to pay attention to your surroundings while driving and make safe choices. Don’t become a pedestrian behind the wheel. Learn to become a real driver.
To me, a professional driver is someone who looks well ahead and anticipates what the traffic pattern will be up the road and then responds to it early. A professional driver is someone who thinks through the actions before doing them. A professional driver is someone who does the proper things more times than not because they know it’s a safer way, despite the fact that they may be late for their appointment because of heavy traffic patterns. A professional driver is someone who respects their vehicle and those around them. They become a proactive driver. Does this sound like you?
We often hear about drivers who crash their vehicles because of the risks they take. Driver’s who speed, weave in and out of traffic and drivers who purposely distract themselves by texting while driving, eating while driving or by having heated conversations with their passengers hurt more than themselves; they hurt everyone near them. Even though they have passengers with them, they still decide to take these chances. Why?
Driving is more than a physical activity of steering, accelerating and braking. It’s done mostly with your brain and eyes. Your hands and feet just help you go where your brain and eyes want. It’s become a very psychological activity in recent years. If drivers began to take pride in their driving ability, maybe crash rates would drop, injuries would be reduced and fatalities would decrease as well.
When I was a judge on Canada’s Worst Driver I met many people who really didn’t care much about what they did behind the wheel or the vehicle itself. It’s certainly not the attitude of a professional driver. Unfortunately, there are millions more people out there with the same attitude who call themselves a driver. Sitting behind the steering wheel doesn’t make you a driver and it definitely doesn’t make you a professional driver.
Now is the time to make the change to become a professional driver. Sit back and take a good, honest look at you; the driver. It starts with your attitude. Change the attitude and then change the ability. With a solid effort over time, you too can become the ultimate professional driver. I dare you.

Leave a Reply

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.
Join 2,075 other followers